Monthly Archive: August 1942

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Kiel (Germany). U604 sets off on her first patrol

1 August 1942. After 7 months of training in the Baltic Sea U-604 is ready for her first patrol. She leaves Kiel and cruises through Kattegat than skirting the coast of Norway into the North Sea. She cruises around the British Isles...

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Abbekerk leaves Trinidad for England

15 August 1942.  The empty ship took an astonishing amount of sugar in all its five holds, absolutely full to the top deck. I know the Captain had been in touch with the shipyards in Curacao to find out if...

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Convoy ON(S)122 to Halifax and New York

17 August 1942 Outward bound North (Slow) 122 is the name of the convoy that left England at August 15th and by now has sailed clear from the English coast on the way to Halifax (Nova Scotia) and New York....

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Unplanned and unwanted: contact with convoy ON(S)122

23 August 1942 On August 22 a submarine was reported by radio, which was on our projected route about 500 miles ahead. On August 24 at 08:15 ships time a position was recieved of a submarine on August 23 at...

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Under attack: nowhere to run or hide

Abbekerk, August 24, 1942, 15:15 In the afternoon the lookout in the crow’s nest observed, just for a short moment, a black object on the horizon at about 55 degrees. After that, using good Prisma binoculars, from the bridge and...

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Torpedoed! “So that’s how it goes…”

23:45 (August 24 1942) When I stepped on deck the ship received an enormous bang. The large vessel sluggishly staggered a few times from left to right. “So that is the way it goes” I thought and raced along all...

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Sunk at 52° 05′ North, 30° 59′ West

25 August 1942, 00:10. I was completely alone in the dark water, my lifejacket held me floating while I saw the big ship slowly settle and sink beneath the waves in the moonlight between the clouds. I had been thrown...

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Two lifeboats, 62 men, 700 miles from nearest shore

27 August 1942. No SOS was sent. The impact of the torpedo destroyed the radio antenna and the emergency transmitter in the lifeboat does nothing. The 62 men are completely on their own in two overcrowded lifeboats. It turned out...

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Saved by HMS Wallflower and radar

29 August 1942. Three days and three nights passed without us seeing anything on the horizon. Which wasn’t that far since our little boats hardly stuck out of water giving us a very short horizon. But then, after three days,...